Workgroup report: Biomonitoring study design, interpretation, and communication - Lessons learned and path forward

Michael N. Bates, Joshua W. Hamilton, Judy S. LaKind, Patricia Langenberg, Michael O'Malley, Wayne Snodgrass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human biomonitoring investigations have provided data on a wide array of chemicals in blood and urine and in other tissues and fluids such as hair and human milk. These data have prompted questions such as a) What is the relationship between levels of environmental chemicals in humans and external exposures? b) What is the baseline or "background" level against which individual levels should be compared? and c) How can internal levels be used to draw conclusions about individual and/or population health? An interdisciplinary panel was convened for a 1-day workshop in November 2004 with the charge of focusing on three specific aspects of biomonitoring: characteristics of scientifically robust biomonitoring studies, interpretation of human biomonitoring data for potential risks to human health, and communication of results, uncertainties, and limitations of biomonitoring studies. In this report we describe the recommendations of the panel.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1615-1621
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Health Perspectives
Volume113
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2005

Fingerprint

Environmental Monitoring
biomonitoring
Communication
Health
communication
Blood
Tissue
Fluids
Health Communication
Human Milk
background level
hair
Hair
urine
milk
Uncertainty
blood
Urine
Education
fluid

Keywords

  • Biomonitoring
  • Communication
  • Design
  • Human health
  • Interpretation
  • Specimen archiving

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Bates, M. N., Hamilton, J. W., LaKind, J. S., Langenberg, P., O'Malley, M., & Snodgrass, W. (2005). Workgroup report: Biomonitoring study design, interpretation, and communication - Lessons learned and path forward. Environmental Health Perspectives, 113(11), 1615-1621. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.8197

Workgroup report : Biomonitoring study design, interpretation, and communication - Lessons learned and path forward. / Bates, Michael N.; Hamilton, Joshua W.; LaKind, Judy S.; Langenberg, Patricia; O'Malley, Michael; Snodgrass, Wayne.

In: Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 113, No. 11, 11.2005, p. 1615-1621.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bates, MN, Hamilton, JW, LaKind, JS, Langenberg, P, O'Malley, M & Snodgrass, W 2005, 'Workgroup report: Biomonitoring study design, interpretation, and communication - Lessons learned and path forward', Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 113, no. 11, pp. 1615-1621. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.8197
Bates, Michael N. ; Hamilton, Joshua W. ; LaKind, Judy S. ; Langenberg, Patricia ; O'Malley, Michael ; Snodgrass, Wayne. / Workgroup report : Biomonitoring study design, interpretation, and communication - Lessons learned and path forward. In: Environmental Health Perspectives. 2005 ; Vol. 113, No. 11. pp. 1615-1621.
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